Poll: are you stressed?

iStock-501702344.jpg

AUSTRALIANS ARE MORE STRESSED THAN EVER BEFORE, WITH MANY PEOPLE SAYING WORKPLACE DEMANDS ARE LEADING TO HIGH LEVELS OF ANXIETY

A report published last year by think tank, Reventure, found that almost three-quarters of people said they are stressed about work and 51% believe unrealistic workload expectations had a negative impact on their workplace wellbeing. And 49% of people said they would be looking for a new position in the coming 12 months, according to research.

Why do employees leave their jobs?

x_0_0_0_14102062_800-660x370.jpg

Recruiters understand that hiring the right employees is only half the battle. The other half involves retaining them in a competitive environment. So why do employees generally leave their jobs? Historically it’s factors such as not liking their Manager, not seeing opportunities for promotion and growth or finding another role with a higher salary.

A study by Facebook recently found that many employees leave their jobs in search of finding more fulfilling work. Data shows that workers who use their strengths more often and feel they are gaining valuable career experience are less likely to leave for another job, according to a recent article from HRD Magazine.

The meaning of work

Meaning-of-work-Thumb.jpg

They say it's a war for talent out there, but what should you do when the war is won?

Small business owners are more likely to realise the importance of a good hire, whether it's one person managing the accounts or a few dozen people working on the ground. In a smaller team, it's easier to see how important every employee is.

Human Resources Director: Should HR try job-crafting?

iStock_16632034_XXLARGE.jpg

Seventy-two percent of Australians are looking for purpose and meaning in work, according to research by global think-tank Reventure. Forty-nine percent are likely to look for a new job this year.

Another study by Facebook shows people quit their jobs because they do not find meaning and fulfilment in the work – even if they enjoy good relationship with their managers.

Meanwhile, those who do stay are employees able to use their strengths and who feel they are gaining valuable experience.

These findings served as basis for a Reventure’s “a future that works” national workplace renewal campaign. The aim is to encourage employees, specifically top talent, to stay in their jobs.

The Real Reason Workers Leave – And How To Make Them Stay

iStock_56883812_XXLARGE.jpg

January and February are said to be the most popular months for job changes but a recent study has found a solution to make good workers stay.

Launched by Facebook, the study on employee turnover has shown people are more likely to quit because their work was unfulfilling – despite having good relationships with management.

Adelaide Advertiser: Perks on the nose in 2018

iStock_45015866_XXLARGE.jpg

WORKERS will be looking for a sense of purpose, wellbeing, and better technology in their workplace this year.

Global HR think-tank Reventure finds 25 per cent of workers would sacrifice company perks for better wellbeing in their workplace.

Three in four workers believe workplace wellbeing programs, which cover everything from flexible hours to fitness programs, are worth the time and money.

A sense of meaning was important to 44 per cent of workers, and is particularly important for millennials (77 per cent).

It also predicts the prevalence of automated systems to streamline processes will continue to rise and more workplaces can expect to see workshops and feedback exercises to help guide the implementation of new technologies.

My Business: Employer bad habits filtering through the workplace

iStock_43437176_XXXLARGE.jpg

Bad habits often associated with business owners, such as overwork and failure to manage stress, are reinforcing poor working habits among employees.

“Although most workers make exceptions to answer after work phone calls and emails for urgent matters from time to time, some fall into the habit of making exception after exception,” said Reventure lead researcher Dr Lindsay McMillan.

Inside Small Business: Why workers leave…and how to make them stay

SMEs-record-highest-resignation-rates.jpg

January and February are said to be the most popular months for job changes but a recent study has found a solution to make good workers stay.

A study on employee turnover has shown people are more likely to quit because their work is unfulfilling, even if they have good relationships with management. Launched by Facebook, the study also shows that those workers who use their strengths more often and feel they are gaining valuable career experience are less likely to leave for another job.

Lead researcher of global HR think-tank Reventure, Dr Lindsay McMillan, said this latest research joins mounting evidence that employees are looking for greater purpose and meaning at work. Earlier research by Reventure revealed that 72 per cent of Australian workers were looking for purpose and meaning in work.

My Business: The real reason employees change jobs

iStock_000048618170_Full.jpg

Employers looking to hang onto their workers should look beyond remuneration and even personal rapport, a new survey has found.

A study by Facebook found that employees are most likely to change jobs if they feel that their work is unfulfilling – even if they have a strong working relationship with management and are performing well in their role.

Conversely, workers who feel they are able to use their strengths frequently and are gaining valued career experience are more likely to stay put.

These figures are supported by research from HR thinktank Reventure, which found that almost three-quarters (72 per cent) of Australians look for purpose and meaning in their work.

Human Resources Director: Is this the real reason why employees leave early?

iStock_exit_11137191_SMALL (500 x 333).jpg

Despite having good relationships with management, many employees are still leaving their jobs.

The reason?

Employees are more likely to quit because they found their work was unfulfilling, according to a new study launched by Facebook.

Data shows that those workers who use their strengths more often and feel they are gaining valuable career experience are less likely to leave for another job.

Lead researcher of global HR think-tank Reventure, Dr Lindsay McMillan said this latest research joins mounting evidence that employees are looking for greater purpose and meaning at work.

HR Daily: Poor work relationship made redeployment unreasonable; HR jobs fall; and more

iStock_56573132_LARGE.jpg

Three key HR focus areas in 2018

HR teams should focus on three key areas during 2018, according to global HR think-tank Reventure.

Lead researcher Dr Lindsay McMillan points out 74 per cent of employees believe workplace wellbeing programs – covering everything from flexible hours to fitness programs – are worth investing in, and 25 per cent would sacrifice company perks for better wellbeing at work.

Technology is the second key trend, and McMillan says the prevalence of artificial intelligence and automated systems to streamline processes will continue to rise, and more employers will be organising change management activities, such as workshops and feedback exercises, to aid their workplace implementation.

Finally, McMillan urges HR professionals to heed employees' need for purpose and meaning in their work. Some 77 per cent of Millennials desire work that meets these criteria, and 44 per cent of employees more broadly say a sense of meaning in their work is important to their wellbeing.

How the real estate employment landscape shapes up in 2018

iStock_43637048_XLARGE.jpg

McGavin’s sentiments echo the findings of global human resources think-tank Reventure who tip worker wellbeing will remain one of our priorities in 2018.

The Reventure research indicates a quarter of Australian workers believe their workplace’s focus on wellbeing increased in 2017, as an estimated 49 per cent of Australian employees are likely to consider looking for a new job in the coming year.

Lawyers Weekly: Year in Review: A thrilling season

iStock-539451696.jpg

The legal dynasty

Millennial lawyers are demanding diversity, cutting-edge technology and a sense of purpose in their work. With this demographic soon to dominate the profession, law firms are taking notice of the sort of employers Millennials want them to be.

“A common pitfall is to solely motivate workers with financial outcomes or competition,” according to a report from HR think tank Reventure.

“With our research finding that the next generation is increasingly looking for purpose at work, leaders will need to actively follow an agenda focused on purpose and meaning in the culture, which will promote the transition into new arenas of efficiency and productivity.”

Inside Small Business: Three key HR trends to watch in 2018

HR-trends.jpg

With the new year kicking off, global HR think-tank Reventure reveals the trends and recurring themes that will shape HR in Australian workplaces in 2018.

Lead researcher of global HR think-tank Reventure, Dr Lindsay McMillan said that after a busy year in 2017, workers can expect to see three key HR trends.

Human Resources Director: Key HR Trends to look out for in 2018

iStock_newemployee_000054380250_Small.jpg

After a busy year in HR in 2017, employees can expect to see three key trends, according to the lead researcher of global HR think-tank Reventure, Dr Lindsay McMillan.

“The main themes for 2018 will be across three pillars: health and wellbeing, new technologies, and purpose and meaning at work,” said Dr McMillan.

5 Tips (and Advice From the Pros) on Hiring Staff for Your Hospitality Business in A Climate of Change

5-tips-to-hire-staff_02.jpg

4 . Consider what’s important to the candidates and communicate that

Many a time, hiring managers approach interviews with candidates as a one-sided thing. But really, it goes both ways and the top candidates are judging you as much as you are judging them.

The high turnover in the hospitality industry also has much to do with workers viewing the sector as a ‘stepping stone’ to another career. Dr Lindsay McMillan, lead researcher from global HR think-tank Reventure says “something that the sector is not doing well is demonstrating that employees have purpose and are valued. As a result, employees feel expendable and find another job as soon as they feel unhappy.”

To improve recruitment and retention, Dr McMillan says that employers should communicate their roles as a job landscape – a list of end goals that are intertwined with the goals of other employees – and not simply a job description.

“Employers can improve their retention rates by demonstrating how a role prepares an employee for the future – whether they want a career in the industry or want to gain transferable skills,” she said.

5 Tips (and Advice From the Pros) on Hiring Staff for Your Hospitality Business in A Climate of Change

iStock-516329534.jpg

4 . Consider what’s important to the candidates and communicate that

Many a time, hiring managers approach interviews with candidates as a one-sided thing. But really, it goes both ways and the top candidates are judging you as much as you are judging them.

The high turnover in the hospitality industry also has much to do with workers viewing the sector as a ‘stepping stone’ to another career. Dr Lindsay McMillan, lead researcher from global HR think-tank Reventure says “something that the sector is not doing well is demonstrating that employees have purpose and are valued. As a result, employees feel expendable and find another job as soon as they feel unhappy.”

To improve recruitment and retention, Dr McMillan says that employers should communicate their roles as a job landscape – a list of end goals that are intertwined with the goals of other employees – and not simply a job description.

“Employers can improve their retention rates by demonstrating how a role prepares an employee for the future – whether they want a career in the industry or want to gain transferable skills,” she said.

Wellness Daily: How stress is damaging your business

iStock-508788310.jpg

Stressed workers are more likely to be looking for a new job in the next 12 months. Is your business lifting the burden or adding to it?

As part of its national workplace renewal campaign, global HR think-tank Reventure conducted research by surveying the views of more than 1,000 Australian workers. The Workplace Wellbeing report is the result of this work and shows that 85 per cent of workers believe employers are responsible for creating an environment that proactively addresses stress in the workplace.

The research unearthed some interesting insights into how Australian workers view wellbeing. For example, 77 per cent said wellbeing revolved around ‘healthiness’, while 73 per cent believe it is more closely aligned with ‘happiness’ and 44 per cent said wellbeing was synonymous with ‘peace’.

Dr Lindsay McMillan was the lead researcher behind Workplace Wellbeing and said the results are a wake-up call for Australian businesses.

Smart Company: Your millennial staff might be shopping for new jobs because of stress: Here’s how to retain them

worried-at-work.jpg

Workplace stresses and financial pressures have crossed all our desks at some point, but research indicates these factors are hitting Gen Y the hardest.

Global HR think-tank Reventure has surveyed more than 1000 Australian workers, finding those aged 23 to 37 are much more stressed than their Gen X and Baby Boomer colleagues, with finances an area of top concern.