Human Resources Director: Hostile workplaces on the rise in Australia

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A “disturbingly high” number of workers in the US have reported working in hostile or threatening workplaces and these findings are largely consistent with the situation in Australia.

The US study found nearly one in five workers say they face a hostile or threatening environment at work, which can include sexual harassment and bullying.

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The Sydney Morning Herald: Are our workplaces more stressed than ever before?

Workplace stress is the great scourge of modern society, with too much research showing just how prevalent it is. But although stress is increasing, there are plenty of steps leaders can take to ensure stress levels at their workplace remain low.

Reventure Australia is a think tank that conducts research and stimulates public debate about workplace matters. Managing director Dr Lindsay McMillan, a respected Australian academic, leads its research program.

Research that he conducted in 2016 found that the way we work is changing, largely as a result of a more interconnected global economy and the ever-increasing rate of complexity at work.

According to Reventure Australia’s research, more than half of all Australian workers agree increasing change and complexity at work are leading to job dissatisfaction and more frequent high levels of stress at work.

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My Business: Microchipped workforces no longer sci-fi

Microchipping employees for greater work performance would be the ultimate micromanagement, according to Dr Lindsay McMillan, lead researcher and campaign director of a future that works at HR think-tank Reventure.

“Microchip implants are used to replace swipe cards or keys, but having one for work means your employer could have a digital record of all your movements,” said Dr McMillan.

“It is vitally important that workers don’t feel pressured to adopt drastic and invasive measures such as microchipping.”

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Human Resources Director: Are microchips the ultimate micromanagement?

Microchipping employees for greater work performance would be the ultimate micromanagement, according to Dr Lindsay McMillan, lead researcher and campaign director of a future that works at HR think-tank Reventure.

“Microchip implants are used to replace swipe cards or keys, but having one for work means your employer could have a digital record of all your movements,” said Dr McMillan.

“It is vitally important that workers don’t feel pressured to adopt drastic and invasive measures such as microchipping.”

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The Cusp: Here's How To Find Meaning In Your Current Job

Global HR think-tank Reventure discovered that 77 per cent of millennials “are looking for purpose and meaning in their employment.” Damn straight we do. So where exactly can this meaning be found? Is it a particular career path, or a state of mind?

Reventure’s lead researcher Dr Lindsay McMillan reckons that we shouldn’t even call them mentors anymore, because what millennials in the workforce need is so much more. Instead, he suggests that we find a ‘meaning maker’.

“Meaning makers are more than just mentors,” he says. “They are in the workplace and they are the people who can say ‘This is why we exist as an organisation and this is why it matters. A lot of people gain valuable knowledge and advice from a good mentor, but it’s not your mentor’s role to then say, ‘Okay, how does that fit into your life goals and your personal mission?’”

The CEO Institute: Hot-desking / Activity-based workplace - A thing of the past?

The autonomy to sit wherever you want isn't exactly what current employees are looking for. As Director of workplace think-tank Reventure, Lindsay McMillan explains that the concept of hot-desking 'was created not with workers in mind, but in the interests of conserving space', therefore, the pitfall of hot-desking doesn’t come as a surprise for her [4]. Moreover, hot-desking is said to be introduced to accommodate employees who largely work outside the office [2] - basically people who are hardly even in the office.

Research noted the general misconception with hot-desking: the sharing of spaces leads to more collaboration. The reality is that collaboration in a workplace is strengthened by having access to adequate collaboration spaces and having mobile technology to utilise them [5]. A fixed-desk environment does not deter collaborative efforts.

Workplace Solutions For A Future That Works

Photo: unicreditgroup.eu

Photo: unicreditgroup.eu

At the beginning of the new financial year, planning for the year ahead is the time to review and refresh workplace practices and culture.

“A Future That Works”, the national campaign by Human Resources think-tank Reventure, carries out research to highlight challenges faced by workplaces, and offering solutions. Their research results, as well as news and information about workplace studies and practices, are freely available via their website www.afuturethatworks.org.au.

The Australian: Mentor Walks, chance for women to exercise and learn at same time

Businesses are being encouraged to review and refresh their workplace practices and culture as the financial year begins, with international human resources think tank Reventure devising five strategies to address organisational challenges.

As part of its A Future that Workscampaign, Reventure lead researcher Lindsay McMillan says workplaces should talk about purpose instead of results, articulate a narrative, create goals rather than restrictive roles, establish good leadership and bring back creativity.

“Increasing productivity is no longer viewed in archaic terms such as longer working hours but how the workplace can effectively understand and harness employee’s individual talents,” McMillan says.

“Each year, the bottom line is the focus of reporting and the measurement of success — leaving little time for visionary thinking or employee development.”

The Australian: Time to refresh

The Weekend Australian Newspaper
Section: Weekend Professional

Businesses are being encouraged to review and refresh their workplace practices and culture as the financial year begins, with international human resources think tank Reventure devising five strategies to address organisational challenges.

As part of its A Future that Works campaign, Reventure lead researcher Lindsay McMillan says workplaces should talk about purpose instead of results, articulate a narrative, create goals rather than restrictive roles, establish good leadership and bring back creativity.

“Increasing productivity is no longer viewed in archaic terms such as longer working hours but how the workplace can effectively understand and harness employee’s individual talents,” McMillan says.

“Each year, the bottom line is the focus of reporting and the measurement of success — leaving little time for visionary thinking or employee development.”

Daily Top 5 Global HR News

2. Five HR solutions needed this financial year

With the start of the new financial year, many Australian organisations are in the midst of reviewing and refreshing their workplace practices and culture.

In response to this, global HR think-tank Reventure has devised five strategies that address the workplace challenges organisations will face this financial year.

Five HR solutions workplaces will need this financial year

As another financial year ends, workplaces around the nation have taken stock, organised their accounts and started planning for the financial year ahead.

But, as financial planning and reporting takes centre stage, Australian workplaces are also being encouraged to review and refresh their workplace practices and culture.

Adelaide Advertiser: Millennials seek meaning

8 July 2017
Adelaide Advertiser Newspaper, Adelaide
Section: Careers • Article type : News Item

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MILLENNIALS would prefer to do meaningful work than have a job that just pays the bills or has fun perks.

Global think tank Reventure research shows 77 per cent of millennials want a job with great purpose and meaning.

Lead researcher Dr Lindsay McMillan says business leaders may need to renew their workplace culture to retain their best young employees.

“More people are starting to consider work as a calling rather than an occupation and treating work as a contribution to our overall life goals – not just a pay cheque,” McMillan says.

“Purpose and meaning are critical parts of work because it helps employees understand that their day-to-day activities and their contributions are important and valued.”

Human Capital Online: Five HR solutions needed this financial year

With the start of the new financial year, many Australian organisations are in the midst of reviewing and refreshing their workplace practices and culture.

In response to this, global HR think-tank Reventure has devised five strategies that address the workplace challenges organisations will face this financial year.

In The Black: Can a shorter work week help work-life balance?

1 Jul 2017
In The Black

Dr Lindsay McMillan

Dr Lindsay McMillan

On face value, a four-day work week seems like the answer to Australia’s work-life balance struggle, but in practice it is more a passing fad than a sustainable solution.

A four-day work week may allow workers another day for family and “living”, but it does nothing to address the bigger issues occurring when workers are at work.  

Inside Small Business: Creating an engaged workforce

When your staff are engaged in the workplace they are happy – and equally as importantly, they are productive and motivated to perform. There is robust data supporting the business benefits of fostering an engaged workforce in small and large business. It pays to make it a priority. Gallup in 2012 found that organisations who ranked in the top quartile for engaged employees had a 22 per cent higher profitability and 10 per cent higher customer service rating than those in the bottom quartile.*

Conversely, the negative impact of unengaged staff on business is high. Aside from reduced productivity and customer service, it is estimated that the cost of replacing staff is between 16 per cent and 200 per cent percent of their annual salary depending upon their role and seniority.**

The Australian: Breakdown Woes

24 Jun 2017
The Australian
Section: Careers • Article type :

Human resources expert Lindsay McMillan has found the main reason employees seek counselling is a breakdown in relationships at work and home.

In his Renewing Australian Workplaces report, McMillan analysed more than 300,000 hours of counselling and found that with big shifts in workplaces affected by technological changes and the rise in part-time work, a greater focus on relationships was needed.

“Relationships are central to how people do their jobs, how people develop and how you can achieve sustainable workplace performance,” McMillan says.

The report highlights four healthy workplace principles to create healthy relationships: inclusion, development, engagement and life enhancement.

Details at: www.afuturethatworks.org.au.

Pay Gap No Barrier to Success

17 Jun 2017
Adelaide Advertiser, Adelaide
Section: Careers • Article type :

Female workers respect their boss more than their male colleagues do – even though they are more likely to be paid significantly less by them.

Research by HR think tank Reventure finds 52 per cent of women have a lot of respect and admiration for their boss.

It compares with just 44 per cent of men, the 2016 Snapshot of the Australian Workplace report reveals.

Lead researcher Dr Lindsay McMillan says it is a surprising fact, as the gender pay gap is estimated at about 16 per cent. “One of the most significant issues in the workplace, and indeed in society, is the gender pay gap,” he says.

“The Snapshot tells us that female employees are more likely to feel respect for their boss, but other data also tells us that they are more likely to be paid less by that boss.

“There could be a variety of reasons for this . . . and we don’t know exactly how this plays into the gender pay gap, but it is clearly doing little to bridge the significant divide we continue to see.”

She says most companies will aim to use merit, experience and contribution to the company as the most important factors in awarding pay increases and promotions.

“However, gender differences in attitude and responses in the workplace contribute to unconscious bias and ways of defining merit and experience, which value the contributions of men more highly than those of women,” he says.