18 November 2017
Adelaide Advertiser, Adelaide
Section: Careers • Article type : News Item

iStock_67294411_XXXLARGE.jpg

CREATING a work environment which is about purpose, not results, can help leaders engage their workers, as well as staff to motivate themselves.

Global HR think tank Reventure has devised four strategies, based on its research of Australian workplaces, for workers to implement to rejuvenate their efforts.

Lead researcher Dr Lindsay McMillan says leaders can often get caught up in the numbers, but workers are the most valuable asset of any workplace.

“Increasing productivity is no longer viewed in archaic terms such as longer working hours but how the workplace can effectively understand and harness employees’ individual talents,” he says.

“Each year, the bottom line is the focus of reporting and the measurement of success – leaving little time for visionary thinking or employee development, which can also genuinely grow the organisation.”

TALK ABOUT THEIR PURPOSE, NOT RESULTS

A common pitfall among leaders is to motivate workers solely with financial outcomes or competition, whether it is with their salary or gaining profits for the organisation.

However, employees increasingly are looking for purpose in their work.

Leaders also need to help workers understand how their personal attributes – such as their abilities and values – uniquely enable them to do their work well.

TALK ABOUT YOUR OWN PURPOSE

While understanding what drives employees, ensure the organisation has a purpose, or find out about it, to which employees can align themselves.

SWAP ROLES FOR GOALS

Instead of a list of KPIs and direct reports, a job landscape outlines a list of end goals, how goals interconnect and how they relate to the goals of other workers in the organisation.

A job landscape is assigned to an employee and can promote a more connected and understanding workplace culture.

RESURRECT CREATIVITY

Carefully select team members for projects to ensure they collaborate and learn from others with different skillsets.

Or, encourage workplace “huddles” which allows workers to have short bursts of creative input to solve problems.